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Children Archives

9 Words Parents Should Never Say to Their Massachusetts Kid

Scientists have demonstrated for decades that Massachusetts parents words exertDreaming Girl.jpg tremendous power over a child's developing mind. What a parent says to their kid has very real consequences and there are words that seem to have overwhelmingly negative consequences. None of this has to do with culture or background or "grit"; this has to do with the practical ramifications of the actions taken by adults. So, yes, there are words that should be removed from the vocabulary of adults, not in the interest of furthering a cultural or political agenda, but in the interest of helping kids become happy adults.

Don't Let "Mom Guilt" Make You a Worse Massachusetts Parent

A unifying theme of motherhood is guilt. Massachusetts mothers all feel it, react to it, and sometimesWoman Multitasking.jpg perpetuate it. No matter what choices are made about childcare, staying at home, working part-time, or pursuing a full-time career, mothers aren't immune to the nagging feeling that we could do better by our Massachusetts kids. Of course, mom guilt can be a good thing if it serves as a gentle reminder that our actions toward our children matter. Guilt, can be described as a healthy conscience and can be useful if it inspires more productive involvement or a sincere apology, or if it helps us bite our tongue.

Why Massachusetts Fathers Are Psychologically Set up to Withdraw from Their Families

There are a lot of tropes about Massachusetts fathers, but one tends to stick outBrain - mental capcity.jpg the most: the distant. He's there, he's present - sort of - but he seems distant and far away. He's the dad on Stranger Things who reads the paper at breakfast and doesn't really seem to engage with his family; he's the dad who comes home from work and immediately retreats to the den. It's a cliche, but it's a cliche for a reason. Men tend to withdraw.

How to Comfort a Massachusetts Child After Mom or Dad Gets Angry

Angry couple.jpgIt's hard being a calm Massachusetts parent. The lack of sleep, the uncertainty of inexperience, the social pressures from other people - all of it undermines the effort to stay chill. Parents aren't supposed to lose their temper, but they inevitably do. And that's upsetting to children. If it happens a lot early in life, research indicates that the stress of exposure to anger can create behavior patterns that affect future socialization, emotional management, and self-esteem. Exposure to volatility can even lead to anxiety issues and OCD. Though the ideal solution may be to remain calm, the more workable solution is to know how to calm a kid down.

Why Massachusetts Toddlers Need Their Dads

Massachusetts children need involved fathers throughout their lives. Kids witBest Dad.jpgh active dads are less likely to drop out of school, become obese, have risky sex, and develop mental health problems. But little boys, in particular, need their dads during the "terrible twos", when boys experience testosterone fueled aggression for the first time and have no idea how to deal with it. During this crucial period, it's up to father figures to show boys how to cope with their emotional impulses, so they don't become aggressive, violent men.

Involved Massachusetts Dads Help Kids Do Well in School

For Massachusetts parents of school-aged children, it can be difficult to ascertain ifSchool 6.jpg academic success a matter of nature or nurture. Do smart, rich parents raise smart, rich kids through genetics and socioeconomics-or by sitting next to them and helping with math homework? What role do father figures play in a child's odds of succeeding at school? A new study in the Journal of Labor Economics suggests that the main factor, stronger than DNA, is involved, active parenting.

How Fatherhood Alters Male Biology For Massachusetts Men

We know how women's bodies adapt to motherhood. Hormonal shifts, neurological flips, and, of course, the obvious post-partum biological changes. But only recently have scientists begun to focus on how men's bodies adapt to fatherhood. We now know that fathers experience changes in their hormone levels (especially testosterone and oxytocin); their brains respond differently to parent-related stimuli, and even their socioeconomic status tends to change once children arrive.

Here's the data behind these conclusions....

What Happens When You Tell Massachusetts Kids They're Just Like Dad

You have your mother's eyes, your father's temperament, your grandfather's wayChildren 29.jpg with language, and your grandmother's personality - or maybe not. It's possible those claims, echoing through the course of your childhood, became a self-fulfilling prophecy. It's all part of the nature vs nurture debate, a story that is often oversimplified in child development by making broad generational comparisons. And those comparisons can be misleading, if not downright damaging, precisely because they conflate fate and genetics.

High Energy, High Cost Massachusetts Parenting Isn't What Kids Need

A full 75 percent of parents believe the ideal form of parenting is hands-on, high-Sports 4.jpgenergy, and high-cost, according to a new study from Cornell University. The study, which queried parents from a wide range of socio-economic backgrounds, found that a large majority of parents believe the best parenting tactics are those in which the parent is very, very involved with their child. That involvement includes facilitating extracurricular activities, playing with children at home and discussing, rather than punishing,
misbehavior.
But as good as that sounds, this shift towards a norm of intensive parenting may actually have a harmful effect on families and the development of children. Because high-effort parenting leaves little time for play, imagination, and self-directed exploration, all qualities crucial to raising healthy productive adults.

In order to find how parents viewed two distinct styles of parenting, researchers brought in a diverse range of parents from a wide variety of backgrounds. These parents were exposed to various scenarios depicting one of two types of parenting.

The Massachusetts "Father Effect"

It's worth being an involved Massachusetts dad. Children with active fathers avoid risky sex, hold down high-paying jobs, have superior IQs, and are less likely to break the law or drop out of school. There's ample research out there on The Massachusetts Father Effect. Here's a breakdown of how it works.

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